10 Ways Your Resume Irks Hiring Managers

Fashion designer Coco Chanel had a personal rule: Before she left the house, the style icon always removed one piece of her ensemble to avoid the faux-pas of wearing too many accessories.  Were Chanel alive today and working as a hiring manager, she would likely offer similar advice to job seekers: You don’t have to include everything.

 

Job seekers do themselves a disservice when they send out resumes with more information than they need. Most employers don’t have the time or patience to sift through the irrelevant details. Here are 10 things your resume could do without:

 

1. Spelling mistakes and grammatical errors. “If you are careless enough to send out this most important document with a mistake… I immediately assume you’ll never care enough about the work you send out representing my company,” says Jose Bandujo, president of New York-based Bandujo Advertising. He recalls one candidate who misspelled Manhattan, despite having worked in the city for a decade and another whose great educational background didn’t compensate for the fact that he couldn’t spell “education.”
4. Interests and hobbies.
If these points of information don’t pertain to the job in question, there’s no need to include them.  “Create a mystery and save these kinds of data points when you start the job,” advises Roy Blitzer, author of “Hire Me, Inc.: Resumes and Cover Letters that Get Results.”
6. Excessive bragging.
Stating one’s accomplishments can be helpful, but when it’s overdone, the candidate can come across as narcissistic, a huge turnoff for employers, Flagg says.

6 Job Search Tips That Are So Basic People Forget Them

By Jenny Foss

The irony of job search advice: There’s so much available that you don’t have to spend more than four seconds Googling about before you land on some nugget of wisdom or another.

Yet, at the same time, there’s so much available (some of which completely contradicts other advice you’ll find) that it can easily overwhelm you. Which, in fact, is probably the exact opposite outcome you’re looking for when you go sleuthing for genuinely useful counsel in the first place.

So let’s do this: Let’s boil things down to a short list of sound, timeless job searching tips that’ll help you fine-tune your strategy so that you may sail through the process (or at least cut out some of the unnecessary time and frustration).

1. Make Yourself a “Smack-in-the-Forehead” Obvious Fit

When you apply for a job via an online application process, it’s very likely that your resume will first be screened by an applicant tracking system and then (assuming you make this first cut) move onto human eyeballs. The first human eyeballs that review your resume are often those of a lower level HR person or recruiter, who may or may not understand all of the nuances of that job for which you’re applying.

Thus, it behooves you to make it very simple for both the computer and the human to quickly connect their “Here’s what we’re looking for” to your “Here’s what you can walk through our doors and deliver.”

Tip

Study the job description and any available information you have on the position. Are you mirroring the words and phrases in the job description? Are you showcasing your strengths in the areas that seem to be of paramount importance to this role? Line it up. Line it up.

5. If You’re Not on LinkedIn, You Very Nearly Don’t Exist

Considering that more than 90% of recruiters use LinkedIn as their primary search tool, this is not an understatement. If you’re a professional, you need to not only be on LinkedIn, you need to be using it to your full advantage. Don’t believe me? Think about it this way: If tomorrow morning, a recruiter logs onto LinkedIn looking for someone in your geography, with expertise in what you do, and you’re not there? Guess who they’re going to find and contact? Yes, that person’s name is “not you.”

Tip

If you figure out how to harness the power of no other social media tool for job search, figure out LinkedIn. It’s (by far) the best resource we have available today for career and job search networking, for finding people working at companies of interest, and for positioning yourself to be found by a recruiter who has a relevant job opening.

See all 6 tips and the complete The Muse article

4 Better Ways to Organize Your Resume

By Lily Zhang

You’ve quantified your bullet points, you’ve curated your skills section, and you’ve proofread it from top to bottom. Sounds like your resume’s all set to go, right?

Almost! There’s actually one more step—and that’s putting all the sections in the correct order. Like with everything job-search-related, this should be tailored to the position and your specific situation. To give you an idea of where to start, here are four great ways to organize your resume depending on where you are in your career.

1. For Most of Us

  • Summary Statement (optional)
  • Experience
  • Professional Organizations / Community Involvement (optional)
  • Education
  • Skills and Certifications

This is where most people begin when it comes to organizing a resume. If you’ve had a lot of different relevant experiences, it might make sense to have a summary statement that helps tie it all together (here’s what that looks like), but if it’s all in the same field, it’s not necessary. The section on professional organizations and community involvement is similarly optional.

The best reason for using this layout is that everything is where a recruiter would expect it to be, which means it’s easier to find and skim your qualifications. And this almost always gives you at better shot at getting called in for an interview.

4. For Senior-Level Candidates

  • Summary Statement
  • Experience
  • Professional Organizations / Community Involvement (optional)
  • Education
  • Skills and Certifications

You’ll notice that the senior-level resume looks an awful lot like the standard resume layout. You’re not wrong; just because you’re at a higher level doesn’t mean you can get away with a convoluted format. How easy it is to skim your qualifications is important, no matter how far along you are in your career.

Of course, there are some differences. If you’re applying for a senior-level position, you’re usually in the clear for submitting a two-page resume. Also, with so much experience and a two-pager, it’s absolutely necessary for you to have a summary statement at the very top. This isn’t really negotiable anymore.

While you don’t want to deviate too much from what’s expected, you do want to personalize it a bit to your own experience and needs. As a starting point, give one of these layouts a whirl and go from there.

See all 4 and the complete TheMuse article 

 

5 Ways To Create A Consistent Brand

Tracey Parsons

Having a clearly defined personal brand can be the difference between top candidate for the position or promotion and also-ran. In an effort to get a leg up professionally having a clear, consistent personal brand is a boon to your career.

However, developing a consistent brand can be a little daunting or even a confusing proposition. But it doesn’t have to be. It can be as simple as the following five steps.

1. Define your Hedgehog Concept

Jim Collins documents the Hedgehog Concept in Good to Great as the convergence of what you are best in the world at, what you are deeply passionate about and the things that drive your economic engine. You can apply this thinking to your personal brand. I would encourage you to think through each of these areas and write them down as you work to identify your Hedgehog Concept.

The purpose of the Hedgehog Concept is this: When you have your Hedgehog Concept identified if focuses you in a unique way. It makes it abundantly clear what’s important and what’s not. It will manifest itself throughout your messaging because anything that falls outside the Hedgehog Concept is not part of your personal brand. This is what will drive the consistency of your brand.

3. Build your profile to support your brand

Your social and digital profiles are your billboard. Having a clear and consistent profile across all social channels and digital properties will go far into creating consistency. That doesn’t mean that every one of your profiles needs to mirror and be exact replicas. However, there should be consistency. Your LinkedIn profile should be very professional, Twitter can be a little less formal and Facebook should be friendlier versions of the same profile. They key is that it is consistent with your Hedgehog Concept with minor variations based on the channel.

See all 5 ways and the complete Careerealism article

5 Tips To Land A Work From Home Job

Sarah Adams

Many think that working from home could be a dream come true. Who isn’t interested in being in your pajamas all day and making your own work schedule? There are many perks to finding a job that allows you to work remotely. However, finding that perfect work from home job you love isn’t always so easy; it takes a certain type of person with the right amount of motivation in order to be successful working from home.

Below are some tips to follow if you want to find and land your dream work from home job:

1. Do your research.

Conducting research about companies that let you work from home is the most crucial part of your work at home job search. Without having any knowledge about the company for which you’re applying, you risk looking lazy (not exactly a characteristic sought out by employers). The research you conduct should make you understand the company’s mission, values, goals, and atmosphere. It should also give you the confidence to engage in a more meaningful dialogue. Places you should look when researching companies are Glassdoor, LinkedIn, and the company website. You want to go into the interview with as much information as possible regarding both the job AND company.

5. Get set up.

Making sure your home work space is organized and appropriate is key to success in work from home industry. Most employers will be looking for you to have a noise-free environment, high-speed Internet, and a phone that easily accessible.

Working remotely can be one of the most rewarding experiences out there today. It provides flexibility in your schedule that a lot of employers don’t offer regularly. If you want to work remotely but don’t know where to start your job search, take a look at this list of the top companies with remote jobs that FlexJobs has provided just for YOU!

See all 5 tips and the complete Careerealism article

How To Get the Job You Deserve, Step by Step

When you’re ready to change jobs, it’s good to take some time and prepare for your job-search project!

Here are the basic steps in your Whole Person Job Search process.

1) Look Back

Look backward at your path. Write your life story or tell your story to a friend. You’ll remember important things you had forgotten. What does your path so far tell you about yourself? You won’t solve your job search in your head. Listen to signals from your body, too!

2) Look Forward

What do you want to accomplish in your life? How can your next job move you down your path, instead of just paying your bills? How can your life goals intersect with your job search? Since you’re job-hunting anyway, why not shoot for a job you’ll love rather than just the easiest job to get?

3) What Pain Do You Solve?

Your power is in your understanding of the Business Pain you solve for your employers and/or clients. You need to be intimately familiar with the pain you solve. Think about your most triumphant stories at work, in any job you’ve ever held. Forget about your “skills” and answer the question “What Business Pain do I solve?”

See all 14 steps and the complete article